Wednesday, August 16, 2017

CLICK ON RED HIGHLIGHTED WORDS IN POSTS TO VIEW LINK. 

NCSU has been updating their website.  Most of our links go to their researched information.
Therefore, some of our older links no longer work.  We are working on fixing outdated links as we become aware of them and apologize if you are led to a defunct site.

JOE PYE WEED

Meet Joe Pye.  This is our Eutrochium purpureum (formerly Eupatorium purpureum) growing in our Wildflower Garden next the cistern pump.  With the tag of 'Weed' added to the name, it may seem like an undesirable plant to deliberately put in your garden.  However, the butterflies and bumblebees greatly appreciate this late summer/fall blooming perennial.  If you look closely at the picture you will see a bumblebee collecting pollen.  You will find other Joe Pye Weeds in our Plants for Wet Sites, Perennial Border, and the Herb Garden.  This attests to its adaptabilty and easy care attributes.  Read here for more about growing this great pollinator garden must have:

And if you want to read the back story of 
"Who was Joe Pye?"  CLICK HERE

Friday, August 11, 2017

WHAT'S IN BLOOM

Our much needed rain has reinvigorated the gardens at the Arboretum.  Except for the vegetables and containers, the plants that are established do not get supplemental water during a dry spell.  It is a true test of survival.  These are some of the plants that are of interest this week:


HERB GARDEN:
1. Ocimum basilicum Red Rubin Basil
4. Allium tuberosum Garlic Chives
5. Lavandula angustifolia Lavender
BUTTERFLY GARDEN:
2. Echinacea purpurea Purple Coneflower
PERENNIAL GARDEN:
3. Coreopsis verticillata 'Zagreb' Threadleaf Tickseed
9. Perovskia atriplicifolia Russian Sage
CHILDREN'S GARDEN:
6.  Rudbeckia hirta Black-eyed Susan
10. Lagerstroemia sp. Crepe Myrtle Tree
PLANTS FOR WET SITES:
7.  Tradescantia pallida 'Pale Puma' Wandering Jew
SMALL FRUITS:
8.  Diospyros kaki 'Fuyu' Japanese Persimmon

Photos by M. Endres







Tuesday, August 8, 2017

FALL WEBWORMS

Have you seen this in the ends of branches on your trees?


In late July and August, the second (or third) generation of fall webworms has hatched and this protective web keeps predators out while the webworms feed inside.  Large trees are usually not harmed by this feeding, but smaller trees might be.  A good way to get rid of them is to poke the web open with a stick exposing the webworms to their predators:  birds, wasps, and hornets.   You don't need to light it on fire as some people may suggest.
READ MORE HERE: WEBWORMS

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

MASTER GARDENERS at FARMERS' MARKET

Bring your gardening and turf questions to the Leroy James Farmers' Market at 4560 County Home Road in Greenville.
Pitt County Extension Master Gardener Volunteers will be there to answer your questions, distribute soil sample boxes, and happily tell you about upcoming events at the Arboretum.

8:00 - 11:30 AM
Saturday, August 5th.