Wednesday, November 30, 2016

CLICK ON RED HIGHLIGHTED WORDS IN POSTS TO VIEW LINK. 

NCSU has been updating their website.  Most of our links go to their researched information.
Therefore, some of our older links no longer work.  We are working on fixing outdated links as we become aware of them and apologize if you are led to a defunct site.

PLANTS OF INTEREST

Our late fall/early winter selection for our What's in Bloom display focuses more on foliage than blooms.  But there is still much beauty in the gardens.  Here are this week's picks:

CPP Area (left to right)
1.   Berberis thunbergia ‘Aurea’  (Golden Barberry)
2.      Berberis thunbergii var. atropurpurea  (Redleaf Barberry)
3.      Camellia sasanqua  (Sansanqua camellia)
4.       Ilex gabra (Inkberry holly)
5.       Ilex vomitoria ‘Pendula’ (Weeping yaupon holly)


6.       Osmanthus fragrans  (Fragrant tea olive)
Children’s Garden
7.       Ampelaster carolinianus (Climbing aster)
8.       Lonicera sempervirens (Trumpet honeysuckle)
 Mixed Border
9.       Solidago rugosa ‘Fireworks’  (Rough goldenrod)
 Small Fruits
10.   Vaccinium corymbosum ‘O’Neal’ (Southern highbush blueberry)
Photos by T. McDaniel


Sunday, November 13, 2016

MAKE A WREATH


Last year's class
Wreath Making Workshop

Pitt County Master Gardener Volunteers will help you create a wreath made from a variety of greenery they have clipped from our Arboretum’s shrubs & trees.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1st
10:00 AM – Noon
or
1:00 – 3:00 PM

Pitt County Agricultural Center
403 Government Circle, Suite 2
Greenville, NC  27834

$10 fee (must be paid in advance to hold spot)
Cash or Check Payable to Pitt County Mutual Exchange

Call 252-902-1709 to sign up and arrange payment.
Each class is limited to first 15 people paid in full.

Bring a pair of clippers and gloves to trim greenery on your wreath.  Master Gardeners will collect the cuttings from the trees and shrubs before the workshop begins.



Friday, November 11, 2016

STRAWBERRY PYRAMID

Our Small Fruits Garden has a new addition.  The curators decided to build a special raised bed for our strawberries.  A big thank you to them and their family members that helped.  We are fortunate to have our 'honorary' MGV's who pitch in when asked. 
The advantages of growing plants in a raised bed are found in this Extension article:  RAISED BED GARDENING.
To start your own strawberry patch, check this out:  STRAWBERRIES IN THE HOME GARDEN.





Photos by K. Previll






Wednesday, November 2, 2016

FALL WORKDAY

There were many busy Master Gardener Volunteer hands at the Arboretum yesterday.  Here are pictures of a few of the workers.   From picking the last of the radishes, raking leaves, collecting fallen branches and sticks, weeding, trimming errant hollies, watering in new plantings, and lots of discussions the morning hours passed quickly.

If you are looking for some garden inspiration, you will find links to all of North Carolina's Public Gardens HERE.







Thursday, October 27, 2016

FALL BLOOMS

Our average first frost is the end of October. However, the 10 day forecast shows our night time temperatures staying above freezing.  We'll be able to enjoy our Fall flowers a bit longer.  If you are looking to add color to your late Fall gardens, check out this article so you'll be ready for next year:  FALL FLOWERS FOR LONG COLOR

Here are a few things you will see in bloom at the Arboretum this week.


Photos by J. Christianson
BUTTERFLY GARDEN
1)  Symphyotrichum novi-belgii 'Winston Churchill' Aster
WILDFLOWER GARDEN
2)  Muhlenbergia capillaris Pink Muhly Grass
3)  Salvia farinacea Mealy Cup Sage
4)  Gallardia aristata Blanket Flower
PERENNIAL GARDEN
5)  Chelone oblique Rose Turtlehead
CHILDREN'S GARDEN
6)  Lonicera sempervirens Trumpet Honeysuckle
7)  Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii Turkscap
8)  Callistemon rigidus 'Woodlanders Hardy' Bottlebrush
LANDSCAPE FOR WET SITES
9)  Callicarpa americana American Beautyberry
10) Tinantia pringlei Speckled Wandering Jew

Thursday, October 20, 2016

FRENCH BREAKFAST RADISHES

Radishes are an easy vegetable to grow from seed.  The seeds germinate fast and they are ready to eat in a short time. They are a cool season crop, best grown in the Spring or Fall in our area.  Click here for some RADISH GROWING FACTS

French Breakfast Radishes were planted in the Arboretum's  Fall Vegetable Garden.  Here's an article that may inspire you to plant some: A HANDY SNACK