Saturday, January 14, 2017

CLICK ON RED HIGHLIGHTED WORDS IN POSTS TO VIEW LINK. 

NCSU has been updating their website.  Most of our links go to their researched information.
Therefore, some of our older links no longer work.  We are working on fixing outdated links as we become aware of them and apologize if you are led to a defunct site.

TONY AVENT TO SPEAK AT PITT COUNTY ARBORETUM

Sunday, January 8, 2017

PEAS AND POTATOES

We're set for a few more days of chilly weather, but then the week ahead is forecast to show a warming trend.  It is time to think about planting some Spring crops.  Start by reading this article: SPRING'S FIRST CROPS
While you are doing your winter pruning  be sure to save some sticks to stake your vining peas.

Sunday, January 1, 2017

HAPPY NEW YEAR



STAY
CALM
AND
GARDEN
ON

Friday, December 30, 2016

PLANTS WITH WINTER INTEREST

It's not all brown and bare at the Arboretum.  Hollies (Ilex) brighten the landscape with their berries and/or glossy leaves.  Click here for a descriptive list of the types of hollies you can grow:

Below are ones you can see growing at the Arboretum:


A Holly Retrospective Plus
 TOP ROW (1-5) BOTTOM ROW (6-10)
  1. Ilex vomitoria ‘Pendula' Weeping Yaupon Holly (Mixed Border)
  2. Ilex vomitoria ‘Nana’ Dwarf Yaupon Holly (CPP)
  3. Ilex x 'Nellie R. Stevens' Holly (Mixed Border)
  4. Ilex crenata ‘Green Luster’ Holly (CPP)
  5. Ilex cornuta ‘Carissa’ Chinese Holly (CPP)
  6. Ilex cornuta ‘Needlepoint’ Chinese Holly (Mixed Border)
  7. Ilex ‘Mary Nell' Holly (Mixed Border)
  8. Ilex attenuata ‘Savannah’ Holly (Butterfly Garden)
  9. Ilex serrata x verticulatta ‘Sparkleberry’ Winterberry Holly (Butterfly Garden)
  10. Jasminum nudiflorum Winter jasmine  (Perennial Border)
Photos by T. McDaniel

Friday, December 23, 2016

POINSETTIAS AREN'T POISONOUS

It's not poisonous, but it could make you or your pets a bit sick if it is ingested. You can read some more interesting history and tips on caring for your poinsettia in this Floridata article. 

Of course, the planting outside would not work for us in Pitt County.

Monday, December 19, 2016

ESPALIER-Our New Experiment


"Espalier is the ancient horticultural art of pruning and training a tree or shrub to grow flat against a support, creating a living sculpture. According to American Garden History, espalier was originally used to create outdoor “walls” in Europe during the Middle Ages and was also planted in interior courtyard walls to prevent late frost bud-kill.  Other records show this technique dates back to ancient Egypt, where hieroglyphs of espaliered fig trees have been found in tombs dating back to 1400 B.C.  The French word “espalier” (ess-PAL-yay) was originally a noun that referred to the trellis or support upon which the tree was grown; today, it refers to the technique itself."

(Excerpt from Stark Bros. Website)


We are trying something new at the Arboretum - A Brown Turkey Fig Tree Espalier.  It is a process that will take several years as we train each year's growth to follow our wire supports.  This link will further explain what we will be doing as the fig grows:  HOW TO ESPALIER A TREE (NOTE:  The article talks about apple trees, but it applies to our fig.)  So, it doesn't look like much yet.  But we will be updating its growth periodically in this blog.  You can see it yourself just outside the auditorium doors at the Ag Center building connected with the Arboretum.

Thanks to Carolina Seasons Nursery for generously donating the fig tree.

Photo by C. Taylor